Mathematics 1

Course Outline

Number

In grade 1, although students say number names to 100, students focus on developing a strong understanding of numbers to 20. Students explore the numbers to 20 using concrete materials, pictures, words, and symbols. Students begin to explore addition and subtraction by solving story problems using concrete materials, pictures, words, and symbols. Students

  • say the number names forward and back by 1s to 100
  • skip count by 2s to 20 
  • skip count by 5s and 10s to 100 using a number line or hundred chart
  • read,  write and recognize the number symbols (1, 2, 3, ….100) to 100
  • create sets of up to 20 objects
  • represent numbers to 20 using concrete materials, pictures, and symbols 
  • describe numbers to 20 in two parts (partition) using objects and pictures and name the number of objects in each part
  • count sets of up to 20 objects, in a variety of ways, to determine how many are in a set
  • count on to find out how many are in a set
  • recognize, at a glance, and name familiar arrangements of up to 10 objects 
  • match numerals (numbers) to sets of up to 20 objects
  • compare sets of objects and numbers to 20 using terms like “more than” and “fewer  than” or “as many as”
  • create sets of objects that have more, fewer, or as many objects as a given set, up to 20 objects
  • name the number that is one more, two more, one less, or two less than a given number, up to 20
  • estimate the number of objects (up to 20) in a set and count to verify our predictions
  • solve story problems to help us understand the meaning of addition and subtraction
  • act out addition and subtraction story problems that are presented orally or through shared reading
  • model addition and subtraction story problems with concrete materials or pictures
  • find and share solutions to addition and subtraction problems using different strategies such as counting, counting on, making ten, one more, one less, doubles 
  • record number sentences that represent how students thought about the addition and subtraction problems
  • create and solve addition and subtraction story problems that connect to our experiences

 

 Patterns and Relations

In grade 1, students use concrete materials, pictures, sounds, and actions to develop our understanding of repeating patterns. Students also use concrete materials to learn about equality (sets that are equal) and inequality (sets that are not equal). Students

  • talk about and explore the repetitions that make up a repeating pattern
  • create repeating patterns using concrete materials, pictures, sounds, and actions 
  • copy repeating patterns that have been created for us and predict what is next in the pattern
  • continue repeating patterns that have been created for us
  • describe a repeating pattern using words (red, blue, red, blue, red, blue) or a letter code (ABABAB)
  • translate a pattern into another representation, for example, from actions to sound
  • identify errors or missing parts in repeating patterns
  • identify events that repeat, such as the days of the week
  • look for patterns in our world and in other subjects like art or music
  • model equality as balance and inequality as imbalance on a pan balance
  • describe equality as balance and inequality as imbalance
  • create sets that are equal or unequal 
  • decide whether two sets are equal or unequal and explain our thinking
  • begin recording number sentences using the equal sign (=)

Measurement

In grade 1, students continue to compare the length, mass, volume, and capacity of objects and students begin to learn about area. Students

  • use language to describe length, mass, volume, capacity, and area
  • predict which object in a set is longest or shortest; heaviest or lightest; largest or smallest; holds the most or holds the least; and has the greatest (most) area or has the least (smallest) area 
  • describe objects using comparison language (shorter, taller, or almost the same; heavier, lighter, or almost the same; bigger, smaller, or almost the same; holds less, holds more, or holds almost the same; or greatest area or least area)
  • compare objects, cover objects, and fill objects 
  • order objects based on the measurements students make 
  • explain how to order objects based on measurements 

Geometry

In grade 1, students continue to learn about 3-D objects, and students begin to learn about 2-D shapes. Students

  • use language to describe 3-D objects (cylinders, spheres, cones, cubes and other prisms, and pyramids)
  • use language to describe 2-D shapes (triangles, squares, rectangles, and circles)
  • make patterns with these 3-D objects and 2-D shapes
  • sort 3-D objects and explain our sorting rule
  • sort 2-D shapes and explain our sorting rule
  • explain the sorting rule for sets of 3-D objects or 2-D shapes that have been sorted for us
  • make patterns with 3-D objects and 2-D shapes
  • compare 3-D objects and describe how they are the same and how they are different
  • build 3-D objects and 2-D shapes that are shown to us
  • explore 3-D objects and 2-D shapes by seeing what happens when students take them apart
  • find 3-D objects in our environment
  • identify the 2-D shapes on the faces of 3-D objects

Updated August 24, 2021