Mathematics 2

Course Outline

Number

In grade 2, although students say numbers names to 200, students focus on developing a strong understanding of numbers to 100.  Students explore the numbers to 100 using concrete materials, pictures, words, and symbols. Students begin to learn about place value (tens and ones). Students also continue to develop our understanding of the meaning of addition and subtraction by solving story problems using concrete materials, pictures, words, and symbols. Students

  • say the number names forward and back by 1s to 200
  • skip count by 2s, 5s, and 10s to 100
  • count money (coins) to 100 cents
  • group objects (by 2s, 5s or 10s) to make counting easier 
  • represent numbers to 100 using concrete materials, coins, pictures, words, expressions, and symbols
  • use concrete materials to decide whether a number is even or odd
  • describe numbers to 100 in two or more parts (partition)
  • read, write, and recognize number symbols to 100
  • represent numbers using expressions (24 + 6)
  • put numbers to 100 in order and compare them
  • estimate the number of objects in a group and count to verify our prediction
  • begin to explore place value (ones, tens) using concrete materials 
  • group objects to see that 10 ones is the same as one ten
  • use ordinal numbers (first to tenth) 
  • continue to act out, model, and solve story problems to help us understand the meanings of addition and subtraction
  • create and solve story problems that connect to our experiences
  • model addition and subtraction story problems with concrete materials or pictures
  • find and share solutions to addition and subtraction problems 
  • use strategies to learn addition facts up to 9 + 9, so students can answer questions quickly
  • use strategies to find the answer to subtraction facts up to 18 – 9 
  • ▪ learn to add and subtract two-digit numbers using personal strategies
  • write number sentences that represent how students thought about the addition and subtraction problems

Patterns and Relations

In grade 2, students use concrete materials, pictures, actions, sounds, and numbers to learn about repeating patterns and increasing (growing) patterns. Students continue to work to develop our understanding of equality and inequality. Students

  • create repeating patterns and increasing (growing) patterns using concrete materials, pictures, sounds, actions, and numbers to 100
  • talk about and explore the repetitions that make up a repeating pattern
  • examine increasing (growing)  patterns and describe how they grow
  • describe repeating patterns using words (red, red, blue, red, red, blue, red, red, blue) and letter codes (AABAABAAB)
  • describe increasing (growing) using a rule
  • develop our own rule for a given increasing (growing) pattern
  • predict what will come next in a repeating or increasing (growing) pattern
  • continue repeating or increasing (growing) patterns that have been created for us  
  • translate a pattern into another representation, for example, from actions to shapes 
  • compare and contrast patterns; for example, students look at the difference between repeating patterns (1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2 ...) and increasing (growing) patterns (those that have a starting point and then grow at steady rate –1, 2, 3, 4 ...)
  • solve problems with patterns
  • create sets that are equal or unequal
  • use concrete materials to model equality (sets that are equal) and inequality (sets that are not equal)
  • decide whether two sets are equal or unequal and explain our thinking
  • explain why two sets are equal or unequal
  • describe equality as balance and inequality as imbalance
  • change two sets that are equal to make them unequal
  • record number sentences using the equal (=) or not equal (≠) sign
  • determine whether two sides of a given number sentence are equal or not equal

Measurement

In grade 2, students continue to explore the measurement of length and mass. Students begin to learn about calendars and time (days, weeks, and months). Students

  • choose non-standard units, such as paperclips, to measure the length or mass of an object and explain why the unit was chosen
  • estimate and measure mass and length using non-standard units
  • explain why using two different non-standard units to measure an object results in two different measurement answers
  • compare and order objects by length, height, distance around, and mass and explain our thinking
  • notice that changing the position of an object does not change its length or mass
  • read a calendar to identify the month, the day of the week, and the date
  • learn about the relationships among days, weeks, months, and years 
  • use those relationships to solve problems involving time (days in a week and months in a year)

Geometry

In grade 2, students continue to learn about 3-D objects (cubes and other prisms, spheres, cones, cylinders, and pyramids) and 2-D shapes (triangles, squares, rectangles, and circles). Students

  • use language to describe 3-D objects 
  • use language to describe 2-D shapes 
  • identify and describe the characteristics of 2-D shapes (triangles, squares, rectangles, and circles)
  • identify and describe the characteristics of 3-D objects (cubes and other prisms, spheres, cones, cylinders, and pyramids)
  • compare and describe how 3-D objects are the same and how they are different
  • compare and describe how 2-D shapes are the same and how they are different
  • sort 3-D objects and explain our sorting rule
  • sort 2-D shapes and explain our sorting rule
  • explain the sorting rule for sets of 3-D objects or 2-D shapes that have been sorted for us
  • make patterns with these 3-D objects and 2-D shapes
  • find 3-D objects and 2-D shapes in the real world
  • build 3-D objects 
  • draw 2-D shapes
  • recognize a 3-D object when seen in different positions 
  • recognize a 2-D shape when seen in different positions 
  • identify and name the faces on 3-D objects


Statistics and Probability

In grade 2, students begin to learn about data collection and data displays. Students ask questions, and collect and organize data. Students learn to display our data using concrete graphs and pictographs. students use our graphs to answer questions. Students

  • collect and record information about questions that interest us
  • organize the information students collect using tallies, checkmarks, charts, and lists
  • use the information students collect to answer questions
  • create our own concrete graphs and pictographs to show information
  • use our graphs to answer questions
  • solve problems by creating and reading our graphs
  • interpret information from graphs

Updated August 24, 2021